Your photos from Book Week 2017 Bethanie Lloyd (K/1P) as Moana and Reinhard Lloyd (5B) as Grug
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Book week at Fennell Bay. The staff were all dressed as Things with the Cat in the Hat.

Halle and Leearna Clemente from Cardiff south public school

Year 5 and 6 teachers at Kurri Public School went as characters from Lord of the Rings!

Charlize & Ryder – St Michaels Nelson Bay

Lillian and Bailey Knox from Holy Spirit Kurri Kurri and Abermain.

BOOK WEEK: There were plenty of exciting costumes at KSPS.

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Cessnock High School

Isobel (Newcastle East PS) went as Felipe the cactus (from the book Hug Me). Her dad made her outfit with cable ties and pipe cleaners.

FUN: Jacob Carroll dressed up as the Monster Truck Maximum Destruction or Max D for short at Merewether Heights Public School 2017.

Room on the Broom witch

Oscar Swan from Kindergarten Merriwa Central School

Sienna – Year 5 at Wirreanda P.S dressed as Hermione Grange from Harry Potter!

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Book week at Belmont public school

Thing 1 and Pocahontas

Reinhard Lloyd (5B) as Grug

Picture: Pennie Looker

Oscar Arnold from Kotara South Public School. Class 4G, dressed as Diary of a wimpy kid.

Picture: Casey Wynne Maliszewski

Picture: Erin Lavender

Bethanie Lloyd (K/1P) as Moana

BOOK WEEK: There were plenty of exciting costumes at KSPS.

Reinhard Lloyd (5B) as Grug

BOOK WEEK: There were plenty of exciting costumes at KSPS.

BOOK WEEK: There were plenty of exciting costumes at KSPS.

Picture: Emmie Price

Picture: Michelle Price

BOOK WEEK: Jace Grainger year 4 as The Man From Snowy River and Jai Grainger as Wilfred Gordon McDonald Partridge by Mem Fox both of Kitchener Public School

BOOK WEEK: Hinton Public School, Lachlan as Jack Sparrow, Alina as Twilight Sparkle, Nic as Quicksilver and Tim as Harry Potter.

BOOK WEEK: Kindy Teachers Rutherford Public School

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK: Crikey! Here is Millah Winsor aged 6, dressed as Steve Irwin for his book week at TPS.

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Cessnock High School

BOOK WEEK: Maxwell Smith, class KS at Abermain Public School, dressed as an explorer

BOOK WEEK: Diary of a Wimpy Kid

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Singleton Christian College

BOOK WEEK: Maxwell Smith, class KS at Abermain Public School, dressed as an explorer

BOOK WEEK: Amelia went dressed as The Very Hungry Caterpillar one day Peter Rabbit another day.

BOOK WEEK: Amelia went dressed as The Very Hungry Caterpillar one day Peter Rabbit another day.

BOOK WEEK: Amelia went dressed as The Very Hungry Caterpillar one day Peter Rabbit another day.

BOOK WEEK: Amelia went dressed as The Very Hungry Caterpillar one day Peter Rabbit another day.

BOOK WEEK: Eight-year-oldAlecia, who is in year 3 at Merewether public school, dressed up as Hermione Grainger from the Harry Potter books

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Aberdeen Public School celebrates Book Week 2016. Picture: Betina Hughes

BOOK WEEK: Rohan Freeman, Holy Spirit Abermain, dressed as an army soldier

BOOK WEEK: This is 6-year-old Olivia. She will be wearing this on Tuesday. She has been calling everyone possum since she tried it on.

BOOK WEEK: School children across the Cessnock region have been caught up in the magical land of literature this week as the Cessnock City Library toured local schools ahead of Book Week 2016.

Picture: Kimberly Johnson

BOOK WEEK: (back to front) Kathy Viner, Bella Martin, Robyn Norris, Elijah Inwood, Jayden Berry, Euan Gardiner, Lily Everett, Gemma Hicks, Noah Martin, Jay Matheson and Sarah Smith from Dungog

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

St Aloysius Chisholm Book Week Parade 2015

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Robyn Farrell

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Robyn Farrell

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Jennifer Armstrong

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Jennifer Armstrong

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Rhianna Hernando

Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Melita Lockwood

Wonder Woman Grahamstown Public School. Picture: Jennifer Armstrong

Grahmastown Public School. Picture: Bec Bartush

St Michael’s Primary School, Nelson Bay.

St Michael’s Primary School, Nelson Bay.

St Michael’s Primary School, Nelson Bay.

TweetFacebook Book Week in the HunterBook Week celebrates the magic ofintroducing young mindsto the adventures of reading. Each yearschools, libraries, booksellers, authors, illustrators and children celebrate Australian children’s literature.

This year’s theme isEscape to Everywhere and encourages kids to jump inside the pages of their favorite books.

With book parades taking place across the Hunter we want to see your best Book Week costumes!

We arecalling on all schools and parents celebrating Book Week to submit their photos forour gallery.

Submissions can be made to [email protected]南京夜网419论坛

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The information of stocks that lost in prices are displayed on an electronic board inside the Australian Securities Exchange, operated by ASX Ltd., in Sydney, Australia, on Friday, July 24, 2015. The Australian dollar slumped last week as a gauge of Chinese manufacturing unexpectedly contracted, aggravating the impact of declines in copper and iron ore prices. Photographer: Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg MARKETS. 7 JUNE 2011. AFR PIC BY PETER BRAIG. STOCK EXCHANGE, SYDNEY, STOCKS. GENERIC PIC. ASX. STOCKMARKET. MARKET.
Nanjing Night Net

Stock information is displayed on an electronic board inside the Australian Securities Exchange, operated by ASX Ltd., in Sydney, Australia, on Friday, July 24, 2015. The Australian dollar slumped last week as a gauge of Chinese manufacturing unexpectedly contracted, aggravating the impact of declines in copper and iron ore prices. Photographer: Brendon Thorne/Bloomberg

The bulls seem to have taken back some control here and while we saw some positive flow and traders veering towards risk assets in Asia yesterday, we expect another positive session ahead and traders adding to risk.

1. China: The Chinese equity markets look interesting as a trade and the message on the ground in China is becoming somewhat more optimistic, with a certain confidence from authorities that they have curbed the level of outflows from the economy. One just has to look at the decline in USD/CNH (Chinese yuan) from late June to see a visual representation of this trade and while the USD has been weak on a broad basis, there have been there have been good flows into CNH and we even heard commentary from a PboC advisor yesterday that the pair may hit 6.500. Which, in effect, would be the strongest levels relative to the USD since May 2016. Stay long China H-shares, A-50 cash or CSI 300 and add to exposures on a breakout of the recent highs.

Another way to play this is through the EEM ETF (iShares Emerging Markets ETF), which has closed up 1.2% and is extremely close to breaking above the 8 August high of $44.58. Happy to add exposures on a daily close through this high on a momentum view and the concept of buying high and selling higher.

2. MIners shining: Mining stocks are having their time in the sun and while BHP closed up 2.1% in London, we can see a strong performance from mining sector in US trade. Again, we can look at ETF’s here and see the XME ETF (SPDR S&P metals and mining) gaining a sizeable 2% and this bodes well for the Aussie equity open.

3. Wall Street: The S&P 500 by way of leads is the backbone of the feel good factor, with strong gains in the NASDAQ (+1.4%) and Russell 2000 (+1.1%). The S&P 500 was looking vulnerable to downside yesterday but has held the 100-day moving average (currently 2419) and we have pushed back above last Friday’s low of 2432. A break above 2475 (the 17 August high) and we start talking new all-time highs again in the worlds institutional equity benchmark and it seems the bulls have latched onto an article in Politico around tax reform in the US. The cynics among us would still suggest the details of the article are too optimistic, but the headline “Trump’s team is said to make strides on tax reform plan” have seemingly thrown some lift back into the market and with the main players apparently holding a consensus on a plan, then perhaps, just perhaps, the Trump administration could deliver on one of its objectives. ‘Buy the dip’ is apparently not dead.

4. Europe: Aside from solid gains in equities, not just in the US, but in Europe too (the German DAX closed up 1.4%), we have seen a tightening of high yield credit spreads, while US treasuries have seen modest selling across the curve (the US 10-year treasury sits +4 basis points at 2.21%). The 2′-10’s treasury yield curve has steepened a touch, and the moves in fixed income have underpinned a 0.5% gain in the USD index.

5. Greenback: USD/JPY has built on the gains we saw yesterday and clearly the market has defended the ??108.82 low I spoke about yesterday and that seems important. AUD/USD traded as high as $0.7951 through Asia trade yesterday but has found sellers easier to come by and is testing Friday’s low of $0.7910. A close through here and the pair prints a bearish key day reversal and opens up a possibility of a move lower. Naturally in this environment, we have seen implied volatility crushed and we are staring at the US Volatility Index (“VIX”) trading down to 11.5%.

6. ASX: Following moves in the S&P 500 futures, SPI futures were trading at 5712 when the ASX 200 officially closed at 16:10 aest and given they reside at 5741 now we are calling the ASX 200 to open at 5775, a gain of 25 points. SPI futures will be interesting today, as a further follow-through buying from local traders and we start to focus on the 17 August highs of 5772, although I would be fading moves here as a short-term trade, with this also taking the ASX 200 back into the top end of the 14-week trading range. Certainly one to watch, but with the Nikkei 225 like to feed off USD/JPY moves and open around 19,483 (+100p) and China in bullish mode there are reasons for traders to buy today’s ASX 200 open.

7. Reporting season: It’s another busy day on the earnings front with names like CCL, IAG, QUB, SGR, SRX, TRS, VOC and WOW reporting numbers. These names are unlikely to be a huge influence on the broader index, but I’d expect some interest from equity focused clients here. As mentioned, it’s the materials space which will likely get the bulk of the attention, but while US equity has provided a strong lead keep in mind spot iron ore closed -0.4%, while Dalian iron ore futures are down around 4%. We should see some buying in energy, with US crude gaining 0.6% on the session. Copper is up a touch at 0.2%, while gold is down 0.5% on the day and has held in well given the moves in USD/JPY.

8. Market watch:

SPI futures up 24 points or 0.4% to 5737

AUD -0.4% to 79.11 US cents (Overnight range: 0.7898 – 0.7951)

On Wall St, Dow 0.9%, S&P 500 +1%, Nasdaq +1.4%

In New York, BHP +1.2%, Rio +2.1%

In Europe, Stoxx 50 +0.9%, FTSE +0.9%, CAC +0.9%, DAX +1.4%

Spot gold -0.5% to $US1285.52 an ounce

Brent crude +0.4% to $US51.87 a barrel

Iron ore -0.4% to $US79.65 a tonne

Dalian iron ore -4.3% to 576 yuan

LME aluminium -0.3% to $US2075 a tonne

LME copper -0.1% to $US6580 a tonne

10-year bond yield: US 2.21%, Germany 0.40%, Australia 2.64%

This column was produced in commercial partnership between Fairfax Media and IG

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Jason Groves (right) President of Liberals Abroad UK entered into a civil union with his partner in 2011. Photo: SuppliedLondon: Liberal party members living in the United Kingdom have declared their official support for the “yes” campaign in the postal survey on same-sex marriage.
Nanjing Night Net

The declaration from Australian Liberals Abroad – UK makes it one of the first officially affiliated Coalition party groups to declare its support for change, despite strong opposition from party conservatives and many elected MPs, including former prime minister Tony Abbott.

President Jason Groves, who is gay, told Fairfax Media the organisation polled its members, comprising about 100, to ask if the organisation should take a position and if so, what that position should be.

Every response was in favour of backing the yes campaign and the executive committee’s decision was also unanimous. Mr Groves said he was not surprised by the outcome.

“In a country where same-sex marriage is legal, and no longer in any way controversial, it makes complete sense,” he said.

He declined to criticise Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s decision to hold the postal survey in the first place, a tactic condemned by Australian Marriage Equality, the leading group campaigning for same-sex marriage.

He said Mr Turnbull, who personally supports same-sex marriage and has previously argued Parliament should decide the matter, had been clear about the plebiscite before the last election.

“I’d rather we got on with it and focused on winning,” he said.

The latest Newspoll found 55 per cent of Coalition voters supported changing the law to allow same-sex marriage, 39 per cent opposed it and 9 per cent had no opinion. The same poll found 63 per cent of voters overall in Australia supported the change. UK an example

Mr Groves pointed to the UK, where same-sex marriage was legalised by the Conservatives under David Cameron in 2013 and came into effect in 2015. Mr Cameron recently told PinkNews that the passage of the legislation was one of his “proudest achievements.”

“Marriage is a great institution and I have long believed that it should be there for everybody; it now is and Britain led the way,” Mr Cameron said.

Mr Groves said Mr Cameron’s success had been won by effective campaigning and taking the country with him on the issue.

He said many of the claims made by critics of same-sex marriage in the UK at the time, and currently in Australia, about potential wider effects of changing the meaning of marriage, had failed to materialise.

“The only effect is that more people have got married,” he said.

But he said it was vital to address concerns raised by religious organisations and honour their right to practise their faith, including the right to refuse to marry gay couples.

“There is a conservative argument for same-sex marriage,” he said. ‘People are on long journeys’

Mr Groves entered into a civil union with his partner in 2011, seven years after they began their relationship. He attended a same-sex marriage on the weekend and said the newlyweds and guests expressed their disbelief that gay marriage had happened in their lifetimes.

“Even the two young grooms said that they couldn’t believe when they were adolescents they’d ever be able to do this,” he said.

“Many guests who come to these ceremonies also would never have thought they would attend, let alone celebrate, the marriage of two people of the same sex. But all you have is joy and happiness, just like at any wedding.”

Britian decriminalised homosexuality 50 years ago but sodomy was not completely eliminated as a crime in Australia until as recently as 1997.

“We shouldn’t forget just how far and quickly attitudes have rapidly changed, people are on long journeys,” he said. Plea to enrol

Australians have until the end of Thursday to enrol to vote. Unlike regular elections, voting in the postal survey is not compulsory.

The Australian Bureau of Statistics is managing the survey and will begin posting the survey form to those enrolled over a two-week period from September 12.

Voters have until close of business on Friday 7 November 2017 to return their forms to the ABS.

But Australians overseas will be allowed to vote online.

“This method will be made available only to Australians overseas,” the ABS said.

“Eligible Australians in these categories will be able to request a secure access code from the ABS. The secure access code is then used to provide a survey response.”

It is estimated that about 87,000 Australians live in the United Kingdom, and Mr Groves urged those old enough to vote to check they had not fallen off the electoral roll.

In the 2013 election, 15,000 votes were registered at Australia House.

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The NSW coalition is spending up to $5 million a year more on political staff since it came to power, analysis of new figures shows, despite campaigning on a mantra of leaner government.
Nanjing Night Net

In the first financial year after the Coalition took office, 2011-12, the government had about 185 full-time-equivalent political staff. That number now stands at about 203 full-time staff.

By the end of June that put the government’s total staff bill at between $25.5 million and $31 million.

Including adjustments for inflation, that amounts to an increase in the government’s political staff costs of between $3 million and $5.5 million since it took power, according to calculations by Fairfax Media.

Precise numbers about the government’s spending on staff cannot be calculated because the department publishes only salary bands, not exact salaries.

About 35 staffers receive the top salary band of between $150,000 and $300,000, or nine more than in the final year of the previous Labor government, according to the opposition’s waste watch committee spokesman Hugh McDermott.

“I think most people would be shocked to know that [Gladys Berejiklian] has loaded up her ministry with political operatives that are paid between two and four times the average NSW wage,” Mr McDermott said.

He accused the Premier of using public money to buy “political muscle”.

But the Premier said she had kept ministerial staff lower than the past Labor government had in the 2010-11 financial year.

“Labor should take a look at their own records,” she said. “The total ministerial staff budget for the current ministry is the same as the budget for the last Baird ministry, despite having 23 ministers compared to 22.

“The total ministerial staffing budget is less than Labor’s last ministerial staffing budget.”

Ms Berejiklian employs about 28 full-time-equivalent staff, only slightly more than former premier Barry O’Farrell.

But the Premier’s staff includes 10 people on salaries in the top band of up to $300,000 including senior media advisers and chiefs of staff, or double the number in Mr O’Farrell’s office during 2012 financial year, according to department figures.

But Ms Berejiklian noted the total number of staff receiving the top pay grade across the government had remained “virtually unchanged” and that ministerial staff wage growth was subject to the same 2.5 per cent wage cap the government had brought in for public servants.

Only six government staffers are in the bottom salary band of between $47,000 and $63,000, according to figures published by the Premier’s Department annually.

Ms Berejiklian’s top counsellors include former journalists cum advisers including Clive Mathieson and Ehssan Veiszadeh, as well as Mr O’Farrell’s former top spinner Brad Burden, who has rejoined politics under the title “Director, Government and Stakeholder”.

Ms Berejiklian took over the reins of power only at the beginning of the year following the resignation of former premier Mike Baird.

But in her former role as treasurer she argued that governments “should be as small and as efficient as possible to ensure resources are dedicated where they are needed most”.

The Coalition also introduced a controversial 2.5 per cent cap on pay increases for public servants upon taking power in 2011, sparking mass demonstrations.

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It’s made with “vine-ripened tomatoes” and crammed with “delicious and plump” olives, but Barilla’s Olive pasta sauce has been found to contain 90 times more salt than other options.
Nanjing Night Net

An analysis of 2215 cooking sauce products sold in the major supermarkets in the past seven years by researchers at the George Institute for Global Health has found a massive variation in salt levels.

It showed Barilla’s Olive sauce was packed with 1.88 grams of salt per 100 grams – more than 90 times the amount in the best option, Tenuta Fragassi’s Napoletana pasta sauce.

“A fresh pasta sauce from the supermarket refrigerator contains almost a third of a daily salt intake in the sauce alone; add cheese and you could be blowing the family’s salt intake to well over the maximum daily limit,” said Clare Farrand, a nutritionist at the George Institute.

“The food industry [must] reduce the amount of salt … to the lowest possible levels immediately to save the maximum number of lives.”

Australians are currently consuming double the World Health Organisation’s recommended daily salt intake of 5 grams a day and showing the consequences, with a third of adults living with high blood pressure.

The study found the saltiest powder-based sauces were made by McCormick (for example, its Garlic & Rosemary Lamb Shanks has 22.38g of salt per 100g) and the saltiest, non-pasta meal-based sauces were made by Pandaroo (its Ezy Asian Thai Stirfry Sauce is loaded with 5.63g of salt per 100g) and Ayam.

Ms Farrand said cooking sauces were one of the highest contributors of salt to the diet, alongside bread, breakfast cereal and processed meat, and reducing the salt content could “improve the health of the nation”.

While the data showed food manufacturers had slowly cut the amount of salt in pasta sauces by 27 per cent since 2010, in line with national salt reduction targets, there were no significant drops in the past two years.

“These results show us that manufacturers can produce these products with much less salt, and we need all manufacturers to reduce the amount of salt to the lowest possible level,” said Ms Farrand.

The study was released to mark the launch of the “Unpack the Salt” campaign, led by VicHealth and the Heart Foundation.

Kellie-Ann Jolly, chief executive of Heart Foundation Victoria, said high blood pressure could lead to a stroke or heart attack.

“We know in a number of foods the salt is hidden, and you can’t see the added salt or taste it, which means you’re unaware of how much salt you’re actually eating,” she said.

“We’ve launched ‘Unpack the Salt’ to help consumers understand the health impacts and to help families reduce their salt intake helping them read labels, giving recipes and tips and tricks.”

McCormick Foods Australia said its “Recipe Base” products were designed to “provide a convenient flavour solution” with the nutritional value of the total meal in mind.

“McCormick will also be reviewing the salt content in our range, and work towards reducing the levels of salt,” Paris Golden, its commercial director, said.

“McCormick welcomes the opportunity to work with the Victorian Salt Reduction Partnership to discuss strategies to help us work toward reducing the salt content in our products.”

Barilla said it had improved the nutritional value of 219 products since 2010, including by reducing salt.

“This is an ongoing process as guidelines evolve and Barilla continues to work to adhere to its commitment on all its products and categories, in all markets it operates,” a spokesman said.

The study also showed on average the salt content of non-pasta, meal-based sauces (for example stir fry, taco and curry sauces) had increased by 29 per cent in the past seven years. Some products contained 10 times more than others.

Black bean/Asian sauces had the highest average salt content, with Ayam’s Pad Thai Stir Fry sauce containing 4.64g per 100g.

Jerril Rechter, head of VicHealth, said: “It’s critical we raise awareness of the dangers of hidden salt in packaged foods to help consumers make the healthy choice for their families,” she said. Shopping tipsTo reduce salt in your diet and for your family, it’s important to know how to check the amount of sodium listed on packaged foods. Use the ‘per 100g’ column to compare the sodium content of different brandsFor cooking sauces, look at the label and aim for less than 400mg sodium per 100gWhen using packaged sauces from the supermarket, try using less – for example, use only half of the packet or jar to reduce the amount of salt you will eat. You can always top up with extra herbs, and vegetablesThe best way to reduce salt is to eat more fresh foods and reduce your reliance on processed and packaged foodsSee unpackthesalt南京夜网419论坛

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